Striatonigral degeneration is a neurological disorder caused by a disruption in the connection between two areas of the brain-the striatum and the substantia nigra. These two areas work together to enable balance and movement. Striatonigral degeneration is a type of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Symptoms of the disorder resemble some of those seen in Parkinson's disease, including rigidity, instability, impaired speech, and slow movements.

There is no cure for striatonigral degeneration, and treatments for the disorder have variable success. Treatments used for Parkinson's disease are recommended. However, unlike Parkinson's disease, striatonigral degeneration is not responsive to levodopa. Dopamine and anticholinergics provide some benefit. Generally, treatment is reevaluated as the disorder progresses.

Striatonigral degeneration progresses slowly. Some patients have normal life expectancy.

Prepared by the National Institutes of Health